bar b q

Thanksgiving Dinner Southern Style – Pies

Chris Lilly of world famous Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-Q in Decatur, AL is talking turkey, well actually pies – grilled pies.  Chris is fresh off his appearance on Best in Smoke on the Food Network and winning Grand Champion at the 2011 Memphis in May but he was nice enough to chat with me about all things Thanksgiving Southern Style.  He was also nice enough to give me a couple of recipes for his amazing grilled pies and one for grilled turkey.  What a guy.  The recipes are below the Q&A.

Chris Lilly Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-QHow has your appearance on Best in Smoke effected your business?

I never realized how many people watched Food Network until I did the series Best in Smoke. This show was different because you not only had barbecue enthusiasts watching it but people who just love food in general. We could instantly see a spike in sales both at our restaurant and on our website. The good thing is that most were new customers who were trying Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-Q for the first time.

What are your memories of Thanksgiving growing up?

Most of my Thanksgiving memories are traditional.  Growing up in a large family meant an overflowing Thanksgiving dinner table with all of the traditional food such as; turkey, ham, dressing, cranberry salad, green beans, black eyed peas, cornbread, mashed potatoes and gravy.  It was a relaxing time with nothing on the agenda but food!

What is Thanksgiving like at the Lilly household today?

Thanksgiving today is a little more hectic.  With two kids in college and extended family spread out across Northern Alabama it takes a little holiday magic to get everyone together for the family dinner.  Sometimes I even have to eat two Thanksgiving meals in one day to make sure we get to all the family dinner parties!  Don’t feel sorry for me.

It seems that my charcoal grill is always hot around Thanksgiving, personally I like to fire up with Kingsford Charcoal. Now I’m the default turkey and ham cooker for the holiday. I always like to throw in an extra surprise for the meal like grilled cranberries to make a more flavorful sauce.

What is your favorite part of Thanksgiving dinner?

Without a doubt my favorite part about Thanksgivings past and future is family. The chance to spend the day catching up around the charcoal grill in the backyard and the dinner table is something I look forward to the most. Thanksgiving is a happy time for my family and what better way to enjoy it than cooking and eating.

Do you have any new recipes that you are making this year?

Whenever I have free time during the year you will often find me in my backyard around the grill trying out new recipes. This year one of my favorite experiments turned out to be grilled pies. I wanted to take the traditional Southern fried pie and give it an extra punch of flavor by cooking it over charcoal. This is easier said than done because most homemade crusts are not grill grate ready! I’m happy to report that I’ve put together the perfect grilled crust recipe. Now I can satisfy my sweet tooth with grilled peach, apple, or caramel pecan pie. You can take it a step further and make grilled breakfast pies or something savory such as a grilled tomato pie.

 

Grilled Caramel Pecan Pie
Recipe Type: Dessert
Author: Courtesy of Chris Lilly from Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-Q
Prep time: 45 mins
Cook time: 6 mins
Total time: 51 mins
Serves: 8 pies
Take one of the South’s richest culinary traditions from the oven to the grill for more flavor. Pecans, caramel and filling are nestled in a half-moon pouch of dough and grilled directly over hot coals to form a crisp shell with a rich gooey center.
Ingredients
    Dough

  • 1 cup butter (2 sticks)
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup flour for rolling out dough
    Pie

  • 8 store bought caramels cut in half
  • 1/2 cup pecan pieces
  • 1/4 cup dark corn syrup
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tablespoon oil
Instructions
  1. Cut butter into 1/2 inch cubes and refrigerate. Measure the water and refrigerate. In a small mixing bowl add flour and salt and mix well. Add in the cold butter until the mixture resembles coarse bread crumbs. Slowly add water, mixing continuously, until a dough ball is formed. Seal the dough ball in GLAD® ClingWrap and place in the refrigerator overnight.
  2. Sprinkle countertop or cutting board generously with flour. Remove dough from the refrigerator and place onto the floured prep area, roll out to a thickness of 1/8 inch. Cut the dough into 5- to 6-inch diameter circles. Removing extra dough from the prep area to reroll and make more pie shells. Immediately peal, lift and flip the dough circles making sure they don’t stick. Yield should be 8 pie shells.
  3. Preheat the grill using Kingsford® charcoal, until the internal temperature reaches 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. Place 2 caramel halves and 1 tablespoon of pecans onto the center of each dough circle.
  5. Combine corn syrup, sugar, butter, vanilla extract and salt in a small saucepan over low heat. Mix until the ingredients are combined. Remove from the heat and stir in the egg once the mixture has cooled. Chill the filling for 15 minutes or until it has thickened slightly. Add 4 teaspoons of the cold filling mixture over the caramels and pecans onto the center of each dough circle.
  6. Lightly moisten the edges of the dough with water. Fold the dough in half creating a half moon with peach filling. Gently press the pie edges together and crimp them with a fork.
  7. Prep the charcoal grill grate by using a grill brush and to brush on a light coat of oil. Transfer the pies to the grill and cook over direct heat, uncovered, for 3 minutes on each side or until the dough turns a crispy golden brown. Remove from the grill and serve.
Notes

Recipe created by world champion pitmaster, Chris Lilly on behalf of Kingsford® charcoal.

Old-Fashioned Grilled Peach Pie
Recipe Type: Dessert
Author: Courtesy of Chris Lilly of Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-Q
Prep time: 45 mins
Cook time: 10 mins
Total time: 55 mins
Serves: 8 pies
In the South, mouths drool whenever fried pies are mentioned. Traditionally they are fried in a pan with butter until crisp and brown. To heat things up, I have taken this traditional dessert to the backyard barbecue. By grilling the peaches prior to making the filling and then crisping the dough pocket over hot charcoal, you can make this Southern dessert a coal-fired masterpiece.
Ingredients
    Dough

  • 2 sticks butter
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup flour for rolling out dough
    Sugar Rub

  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/16 teaspoon nutmeg
    Pies

  • 2 pounds ripe peaches (3 large or 4 medium)
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 6 tablespoons light brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon oil
Instructions
  1. Cut butter into 1/2 inch cubes and refrigerate. Measure the water and refrigerate. In a small mixing bowl add flour and salt and mix well. Add in the cold butter until the mixture resembles coarse bread crumbs. Slowly add water, mixing continuously, until a dough ball is formed. Seal the dough ball in GLAD® ClingWrap and place in the refrigerator overnight.
  2. Sprinkle countertop or cutting board generously with flour. Remove dough from the refrigerator and place onto the floured prep area, roll out to a thickness of 1/8 inch. Cut the dough into 5- to 6-inch diameter circles. Removing extra dough from the prep area to re-roll and make more pie shells. Immediately peal, lift and flip the dough circles making sure they don’t stick. Yield should be 8 pie shells.
  3. Preheat the grill using Kingsford® charcoal, until the internal temperature reaches 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. In a small bowl add the sugar rub ingredients and mix well.
  5. Remove the pit from the peaches and cut each peach into 8 wedges and remove skin. Generously coat the peach wedges with the sugar rub mix. Immediately place the peaches on the grill grate for 2 minutes on each side, or until they caramelize. Remove the peaches from the grill and dice them into 1/2 inch pieces. Place the peaches and butter into a medium mixing bowl. When the butter melts, add the brown sugar and flour and mix well. Stir in orange juice.
  6. Place 2 heaping tablespoons of peach filling onto the center of each circle of dough. Lightly moisten the edges of the dough with water. Fold the dough in half creating a half moon with peach filling. Gently press the pie edges together and crimp them with a fork.
  7. Prep the charcoal grill grate by using a grill brush and to brush on a light coat of oil. Transfer the pies to the grill and cook over direct heat, uncovered, for 3 minutes on each side or until the dough turns a crispy golden brown. Remove from the grill and serve.
Notes

Recipe created by world champion pitmaster, Chris Lilly on behalf of Kingsford® charcoal.

Charcoal-Grilled Turkey with Fresh Herb Butter
Recipe Type: Entree
Author: Courtesy of Chris Lilly of Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-Q
Prep time: 20 mins
Cook time: 3 hours 45 mins
Total time: 4 hours 5 mins
Serves: 10
Recipe created by champion pitmaster, Chris Lilly, on behalf of Kingsford® charcoal.
Ingredients
    Bird

  • 1 whole turkey (12 pounds)
  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  • Coarse ground black pepper
    Fresh Herb Butter

  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter
  • cup chopped Italian parsley
  • cup chopped green onion tops
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 ½ teaspoon garlic salt
  • 1½ teaspoon celery salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
    Gravy

  • 2 cups turkey stock (as directed)
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 4 teaspoons cornstarch
Instructions
  1. Place the whole turkey breast side down on a cutting board. Remove the neck and giblets and set aside to make the turkey stock. With a sharp knife or a pair of kitchen shears, cut the turkey down each side of the backbone, removing it completely. Open the turkey and press it flat on the cutting board. Using a sharp knife, loosen the breast bone from between the turkey breasts and remove it with your fingers. This will enable the turkey to open completely flat. Apply a light coat of olive oil to the turkey skin and liberally season the skin with kosher salt and black pepper.
  2. Build a charcoal fire for direct grilling. The heat over the coals should be hot, (approximately 450 to 500 degrees F).
  3. Melt the butter in a medium sauce pan. Add the remaining fresh herb butter ingredients, mix well, and keep warm until needed.
  4. To make turkey stock, add 3½ cups water, 1 ¾ teaspoons salt, turkey neck and giblets to a medium sauce pan. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 1½ hours.
  5. Place the butterflied turkey directly over the coals, skin side down, and baste with the fresh herb butter. Grill the turkey for 5 to 7 minutes or until the skin starts to turn golden brown and begins to crisp. Transfer the turkey to a 10”x10” baking dish skin side up, place it back on the grill, and baste with fresh herb butter. Cover the grill and close the air dampers reducing the cooking temperature to 350 degrees F. Cook for 2½ hours basting every hour with the remaining fresh herb butter. The internal temperature of turkey thigh should reach 175 to 180 degrees F while the breast meat should reach 160 to 165 degrees F. Remove the turkey from the grill, cover it with foil, and let it rest for 15 minutes prior to carving.
  6. To make the gravy, scrape all of the drippings and liquid from the bottom of the roasting pan into a small bowl. Skim the grease from the top of the liquid. Pour the seasoned liquid, about ¾ cup, into a small sauce pan. In a small bowl, whisk the two tablespoons water with the cornstarch until smooth. Add the cornstarch slurry and two cups of the pre-made turkey broth to the sauce pan and heat. Serve drizzled over the turkey or on the side as table gravy.

July Fourth Recipe: The Big Tex

Armed with a box of aFire Coconut Charcoal (available at amazon) and a brisket that is just simply too damned big, Stuart shows you how to make a Texas style Po’ Boy with smoked beef, onion marmalade, extra sharp Vermont white cheddar and a taste of BBQ sauce. This is part of iFood.tv’s Summer Grilling Series. So take that.

[ad] Empty ad slot (#1)!

Is the Brick Pit the Best Que in the South?

In a state that is a veritable melting pot of BBQ styles there is a joint that just may out shine the best in the nation.  While the north end of the state has a style similar to Memphis the east trends towards the high vinegar sauces of the Carolinas.  Of course there is also that unique “Alabama White” sauce made famous by Big Bob Gibson’s.

Now in South Alabama most folks are drawn to the Kansas City style of barbecue imploring well smoked meats with a sweet/smokey tomato based sauce and there is one place that does it better than the rest, The Brick Pit.

The “Pit” is just blocks from the campus of the University of South Alabama and it BBQ Spare Ribslooks like a BBQ joint should.  In a word, shabby.  Uneven floor, wobbly tables and the walls, corner posts and even the ceiling is covered with graffiti.  It is a custom to sign the walls whenever you visit.  The walls are also adorned with awards, national write-ups and pictures of all the of football players and coaches that frequent the week of the Senior Bowl.

The Brick Pit is on virtually every “Top 100″ lists out there and they have been profiled on national TV numerous times.  The menu is simple: pulled pork, brisket, chicken and Mobile’s favorite ribs.  They are tender from smoking not from boiling, steaming or roasting.  Low and slow just like they’re supposed to be.  The sides are the usual suspects – slaw, potato salad and baked beans.  Que is available dry or with a helping of their classic KC style sauce.  The Brick Pit may not be the best BBQ joint in the country but it is definitely on the short list.

Check out this clip from the Travel Channel’s Man vs Food Nation hosted by Adam Richman.

7 Questions with “Dr. BBQ” Ray Lampe

7 Questions is a series of interviews with the culinary movers and shakers you want or ought to know better.

Spring is just around the corner so it’ll soon be time to fire up the grill.  Barbecue is one of those uniquely American dishes that vary from region to region. In the Carolinas BBQ means slow smoking a whole hog and sauce of made of vinegar and little else. In Memphis it’s about spare ribs with a dry rub – sauce is optional. Kansas City is famous for all cuts of meat and a sauce that is thick, sweet and sassy. Texas BBQ revolves around beef brisket and sauce of any kind is frowned upon. Most of the rest of the country enjoys some combination of these with the occasional local spin like the white BBQ sauce of Alabama, San Francisco’s SFQ Sauce with dark chocolate and coffee or New Orleans’ BBQ shrimp which are actually sautéed in butter having virtually nothing in common with what most folks call BBQ.

With so much diversity it would be nice if there was one “go to” resource for all things barbecue. Someone to whom the masses could rely on to help, enter Ray Lampe aka Dr. BBQ.  A native of Chicago, Lampe now makes his home in the Mecca of barbecue, the Deep South, specifically Lakeland, FL.

Dr. BBQ’s trademark snow colored goatee and flame covered bowling shirts have made him an icon of the nation’s barbecue aficionadi. After securing a reputation as a talented BBQ cook-off contestant, Ray has now established himself as well seasoned judge both on the national circuits and on televised spectacles for the Food Network.

Recently I spoke with Dr. BBQ and he was courteous enough to answer 7 Questions:

Where did the name “Dr. BBQ” originate?

Ray LampeI was living in Chicago and started cooking in BBQ contests.  It was starting to become an obsessive hobby and I’d bought a new van to carry my stuff around.  Illinois had started allowing us to have vanity plates about the time I got the new van so I figured I’d better get some kind of BBQ plate.  I listed three options to choose from and I honestly don’t even remember what they were.  They sent me the Dr. BBQ plate and I put it on my van.  I really didn’t know I was creating a brand.

When did you start doing the BBQ thing on a professional level?

Mike Royko, the old (Chicago) Tribune columnist for many years, decided to have this rib cook-off at Grant Park right there where the ball fields are.  We had a rib cook-off there in 1982.  It actually continued on through to 1990.  I knew I cooked pretty well but I wasn’t a BBQ cook really but a friend of mine signed us up for it just to go down there and party.  I decided if we were going to go I might as well learn how to cook some ribs.  That was the start of it all.

When did you hit the national circuit?

In 1991 I was looking around for something to replace it (Grant Park cook-off) and I saw a thing in the newspaper they were going to have the first Illinois State BBQ Championship in West Chicago.   It was going to be sanctioned by the KCBS – that was the first Kansas City Barbecue cook-off in Illinois.

If it weren’t for cooking what other career could you see yourself in?

Actually I had a successful family trucking business.  When my father passed away I took over.  By the year 2000 after 25 years trucking had changed and the whole climate had changed.  Things were changing and things weren’t going to be the same anymore.

What lead to the transition from the BBQ circuit to media?

In probably ’04 barbecue was becoming popular and I was one of the guys that had been around the cook-off circuit for a long time and I had the silly beard and the silly haircut and I could speak in public.  Frankly I was really the only guy trying to become a BBQ spokes model so it was kind of an open field.  AndI pushed my way into that and ended up with Big Green Egg.  I started writing an article for Fiery Foods Magazine, Dr. BBQ column.  Dave (DeWitt – Fiery Foods editor) connected me with a publisher and I wrote my first cookbook.  It’s really a story of breaks and doors that opened for me and I just walked right in.  These days I still work for Big Green Egg and I’m starting to write my sixth cookbook.

Of the various regional styles of barbecue do you prefer one over the others?

I wrote a book called Dr. BBQ’s Big-Time Barbecue Road Trip! and I spent a lot of time eating in what are the big four regions of BBQ along with every place in between and what I found was it’s not quite like people think it is.  In Memphis I found that a lot of places serve ribs wet or dry because that’s what’s always written about.  But I did find in Memphis was that almost every BBQ restaurant in Memphis serves with BBQ spaghetti as a side and almost all of them serve smoked bologna topped with Cole slaw as a sandwich.  Now I thought Cole slaw on a sandwich was just a Carolina thing.  I found a lot of that stuff and I thought it was interesting.  Memphis BBQ, I like Memphis BBQ a lot.  I think they ar ahead of the curve using dry rubs.

What’s next for Dr. BBQ?

You know, I don’t try to plan it.  I just try to react and see what’s happening.  You know I really enjoyed doing Tailgate Warriors so maybe there’s a TV show in my future.

Follow Stuart via “the Online”

Sip & Chew with Mike and Stu

Add to Google

addtomyyahoo4

Stuart in 80 Words or Less

Stuart is a celebrity chef, food activist and award-winning food writer. He penned the cookbooks Third Coast Cuisine: Recipes of the Gulf of Mexico, No Sides Needed: 34 Recipes To Simplify Life and Amigeauxs - Mexican/Creole Fusion Cuisine. He hosts two Internet cooking shows "Everyday Gourmet" and "Little Grill Big Flavor." His recipes have been featured in Current, Lagniappe, Southern Tailgater, The Kitchen Hotline and on the Cooking Channel.

Stu’s Latest Kindle Single is Just $2.99

Stuart’s Honors & Awards

2015 1st Place Luck of the Irish Cook-off
2015 4th Place Downtown Cajun Cook-off
2015 2nd Place Fins' Wings & Chili Cook-off
2014 2015 4th Place LA Gumbo Cook-off
2012 Taste Award nominee for best chef (web)
2012 Finalist in the Safeway Next Chef Contest
2011 Taste Award Nominee for Little Grill Big Flavor
2011, 12 Member: Council of Media Tastemakers
2011 Judge: 29th Chef's of the Coast Cook-off
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Wing Cook-off
2011 Cooking Channel Perfect 3 Recipe Finalist
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Gumbo Cook-off
2011 Culinary Hall of Fame Member
2010 Tasty Awards Judge
2010 Judge: Bayou La Batre Gumbo Cook-off
2010 Gourmand World Cookbook Award Nominee
2010 Chef2Chef Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2010 Denay's Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2009 2nd Place Bay Area Food Bank Chef Challenge
2008 Tava: Discovery Contest Runner-up

Archives

Subscribe to this blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

ISO 9000 Culinary Arts Certification