Chopped All Stars

Chopped: All Stars Season 2 Contestants Announced

Chopped All Stars

A few months ago a friend within the Food Network family hipped me to who the four Food Network Star participants in Chopped: All Stars would be.  So I’ve known since last fall that we’d get to see the charms of Penny Davidi and Chris Nirschel on display once again and have managed to keep it to myself.  Even better we also get to see Vic Moea and Justin Balmes cook again.

The talent in this group runs the gamut.  Chris is the chef at what many consider a wannabe Olive Garden, Penny is a one trick pony but she does that one trick extremely well and then Vic and Justin are top notch chefs.  But these guys make up just one night of Chopped: All Stars.  Dig the rest.

Part 1, “Iron Chefs Do Battle” Premieres Sunday, April 8th at 9pm ET/PT  Competitors: Iron Chefs Cat Cora, Marc Forgione, Jose Garces and Michael Symon.  Judges: Scott Conant, Aaron Sanchez, Geoffrey Zakarian

Part 2, “Prime Time vs. Day Time” Premieres Sunday, April 15th at 9pm ET/PT  Competitors: Show hosts Keegan Gerhard (Food Network Challenge), Jeffrey Saad (United Tastes of America, Cooking Channel), Aarti Sequeira (Aarti Party) and Marcela Valladolid (Mexican Made Easy).  Judges: Amanda Freitag, Aaron Sanchez, Geoffrey Zakarian

Part 3, “Food Network Star Contestants” Premieres Sunday, April 22nd at 9pm ET/PT  Competitors: Food Network Star Season Seven Finalists Justin Balmes, Penny Davidi, Vic “Vegas” Moea and Chris Nirschel.  Judges: Scott Conant, Amanda Freitag, Aaron Sanchez

Part 4, “Judge Remix” Premieres Sunday, April 29th at 9pm ET/PT  Competitors: Chopped judges Alex Guarnaschelli, Marc Murphy, Marcus Samuelsson and Chris Santos. Judges: Amanda Freitag, Aaron Sanchez, Geoffrey Zakarian

Part 5, “Grand Finale” Premieres Sunday, May 6th at 9pm ET/PT Competitors: Prior episode winners.  Judges: Anne Burrell, Amanda Freitag and Aaron Sanchez.

Read full chef bios HERE.  Read bios for judges and host Ted Allen HERE.

Read my exclusive interviews with Alex Guarnaschelli (HERE), Scott Conant (HERE), Justin Balmes, (HERE) Penny Davidi (HERE), Chris Nirschel (HERE), Marc Forgione (HERE), Michael Symon (HERE) and Ted Allen (HERE and HERE).

Chopped All-Stars Season 2 Chef Bios

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Food Network Wraps 2011 With Most-Watched Year Ever

Food Network Press Release:

4th Quarter Most-Watched Quarter in Network History

Ranked Top 10 Cable Network 3rd Year in a Row

NEW YORK – December 15, 2011–Food Network delivers its most-watched year ever posting a .5 among adults 25-54 and was watched nightly by an average of 1.1 million total viewers (574k adults 25-54), making it a top 10 cable network for the 3rd year in a row.  The network’s 4th quarter was its most-watched in its history, averaging a .6 Adults 25-54 rating and up 20% from 2010 and was a top five cable network* among upscale adults 25-54 in $100k+ households.

Restaurant: ImpossibleFood Network’s Sunday night tentpole programming was the ratings tour de force, beginning with Chopped All-Stars posting a 1.7 adults 25-54 and triple-digit increases in both ratings and impressions for time period delivery in 2010.  Food Network Star was watched by a cumulative of 35.4 million total viewers and the show’s finale was the #1 show of the night among cable programs posting a 1.9 adults 25-54 rating. Season four of The Next Iron Chef: Super Chefs had a record-setting debut for the franchise ranking 2nd for the night among ad-supported cable networks. To date, the season has posted an average 1.5 rating and 1.52 million impressions among adults 25-54. The network also successfully launched new Robert Irvine series Restaurant: Impossible, with season two averaging a .8 rating and 841k impressions among adults 25-54, an increase of 33% and 24% respectively from season one which launched earlier in the year.

“Food Network finishing the year strong proves it continues to be a powerful centerpiece in the food media category engaging audiences across all of our platforms,” said Brooke Johnson, President, Food Network & Cooking Channel. “As long as there is a hunger for our content, our team is committed to satisfy it, not just on Food Network, but on Cooking Channel, across our digital platforms, in our magazine and through our brand extensions.”

The Scripps food category websites including: CookingChannelTV.com, Food.com and FoodNetwork.com saw more traffic than any other online food entity in 2011 with a monthly average of 262 million page views** and also averaged 19.6 million monthly unique visitors. FoodNetwork.com also broke the site’s record for single-day traffic with over 30 million page views the day before Thanksgiving. Additionally in November, CookingChannelTV.com, Food.com and FoodNetwork.com had their highest page-view traffic to date. Food Network’s recipe “In The Kitchen” app has also been the #1 paid app in the culinary category for over a year and the Food Network brand Facebook page has more than doubled its fan base reaching 2.2 million fans.

Food Network has also had continued success with its brand extension businesses, seeing the Food Network Magazine sustained its run as #1 in newsstand sales within the epicurean category and #6 in overall newsstand sales. Additionally, the Food Network publishing partnerships included the successful launch of 8 cookbooks, including, Food Network Magazine Great Easy Meals, Guy Fieri Food, Cook Like a Rock Star, and Good Eats 3: The Later Years, residing on the NYT bestseller list for a combined 20 weeks.

*at time of release according to Nielsen Media Research

**according to ComScore through November 2011

Inside Look: 24 Hour Restaurant Battle’s Scott Conant

24 Hours Restaurant Battle

On Food Network’s 24 Hour Restaurant Battle dueling teams of aspiring restaurateurs have 24 hours to conceive, plan and open their own restaurants for one night.  On each team, one person handles front-of-house issues like decor, seating and service while the other manages back-of-house matters like menu planning, shopping and, of course, cooking.

When the doors open, each restaurant serves a discerning group of diners along with host Scott Conant and a rotating panel of judges representing three areas of expertise: restaurant marketer, restaurant reviewer and restaurant investor. Based on the restaurant’s concept, execution and viability, the judges choose a winning team who receive $10,000 to start their dream.

I think Battle is an under-appreciated example of the whole food competition reality genre.  Maybe that’s because it doesn’t feature the back-biting and snide remarks that are what makes a lot of the other shows popular.  I’ve gone on record before saying that I care more about the food than watching people behaving badly.

Perhaps that is why I count myself as a fan of Battle.  There is a place in reality TV for good-things-happening-to-good-people shows.  Look at the success ABC has had with Extreme Makeover: Home Edition.  Sometimes you just want to watch something that makes you feel better about what is a very disturbing world.

Scott Conant is a very well-respected chef and highly successful restauranteur which makes him the perfect host for a show that is as much about cultivating ideas as it is about awarding a winner.  Sure Conant has six outstanding restaurants and best-selling cookbooks like Bold Italian, Scott Conant’s New Italian Cooking and Pasta but he has also co-written a book about team work entitled 101 Teambuilding Activities: Ideas Every Coach Can Use to Enhance Teamwork, Communication and Trust that transcends the restaurant world.

With season two of 24 Hour Restaurant Battle set to premiere tonight I chatted with Scott to get a feel for what’s it’s like on the set.

Ted Allen calls you the tomato whisperer, what’s that all about?

Scott Conant of 24 Hour Restaurant BattleHe calls me all kinds of things.  That’s the only one I can tell you about.

You know I do a spaghetti with tomato and basil and Ted happens to be a fan of it which is good for me.  We get a lot of press out of that spaghetti with tomato and basil so it’s fortunate.  He likes what we do with it.  I’ve made it with him a couple of times and he’s working on it so it’s all good.

After the success of Chopped All-Stars there is undoubtedly going to be another one.  How much pressure is Aarón putting on you to compete?

You know I tell Aarón all the time I have six restaurants in five different markets I’m working on an events company as well so I compete enough in real life so there’s no reason for me to go behind those stoves.  I have to tell you, it doesn’t get out very often but on Chopped that is an incredibly difficult competition.  I’ve done those things in the past as I was coming up in the ranks and it’s tough.

Even though I’m kind of hard on some of these people sometimes it’s tough what they’re trying to do especially with all those cameras in your face that doesn’t make things easy.

Can you compare  your duties on Chopped and on 24 Hour Restaurant Battle?

They are different.  On 24 Hour Restaurant Battle we have to look at the whole – the entire restaurant concept.  It’s not about picking it apart; it’s about finding some of the things that work and some of the things that don’t work.  Which is what I do in real life with the restaurants that I open.  It’s really tough to remain objective when I opened my own restaurants.  There isn’t a single day when I’ve shot one of those shows where I haven’t learned something myself about what I do on a daily basis.  I see the same mistakes that amateurs are making as seasoned restauranteurs are making.

On Chopped it’s really about the food.  It’s about how to make this really varying basket of ingredients seamless in how they come together.  A lot of people can do it a lot better than others especially with the time frame.

What exactly are you and the judges looking for from the contestants considering the 24 hour window?

Scott Conant and Gabriella Gershenson of 24 Hour Restaurant BattleWhat I always say is that we’re looking for clean, sure, well thought-out ideas.  Not just things going halfway or this is my intention but this is the idea.  It’s really about opening a restaurant in 24 hours and you have to have everything buttoned up; everything has to be 100% of your ability.  Sometimes the most simple approach works best.  But I think that translates to real life as well.  The more simple the better.

Even if you’re doing something very fancy, if you’re doing a high-end restaurant simplicity is inherently better for the customer.

Are there any dishes that you’ve tried on 24 Hour Restaurant Battle that really stand out in your memory?

Yeah, I can’t speak about this current season but I can talk about the first season there was some great barbecue that we had on season one.  We had some great little brunch ideas.  You know it’s funny because two of the contestants from the first season have actually gone on and opened restaurants of their own based on a lot of the critiques the we gave helping them move forward.  That created a very different standard for themselves than they were when they first thought of opening up their own business.

That’s the real potential for me with this show.  It’s really kind of nurturing and helping people, mentoring to a certain extent about how to get a pure, clean idea and how to make it straight forward for a business plan.

Have there been any concepts that you wish you had thought of?

There were a couple of things that I thought really resonated but I will say there were a few people that I said, “I would definitely hire this person.  I’d love this person and they could definitely give me a call if they need a job because I would hire them.”

Have you ever heard someone explain their concept and immediately felt it was doomed?

Yes.

But you know what?  There are certain things that I’m good at and certain things I’m not good at.  I think that I do what I do very well and I can pick out and point out certain things but it’s always surprising what succeeds.  You’re always going to fail if you don’t try.  So even if it is something that I may not ever go to or I may never eat at that restaurant it doesn’t mean that it won’t work for the rest of humanity.  So there’s no reason not to try it out.

Who will be the judges this season?

Drew Nieporent did a few shows.  Geoffrey Zakarian, I think he did the majority of the shows as well.  Geoffrey and I always have a fun dynamic.  Alison Brod, for a PR perspective, did a few shows.  Gabriella Gershenson for a food writer’s perspective.  She works at Saveur magazine.  Marcus Samuelsson did a few shows as well for another chef’s perspective, restauranteur’s perspective.  So it’s a great group, Ben Leventhal from The Feast: New York and eater.com he did a show.  He may have done two.  There’s a couple of other experts that we had for different approaches.  There’s a lot of knowledge at that judges’ table.

The chance at having your own restaurant, even for one night, is a dream that all of us in this business share.  How emotional does it get on set?

You know, it’s really amazingly emotional for a lot of people.  This is a dream come true and I don’t think that can ever be overstated.  People are working really hard and they’re doing something that they’ve always wanted to do.  If they’re going through a funk or they’re in a bad time this is their way out.  That’s one of the things that I really appreciate about it (the show) as well.  We’re here to help people.  We’re here to nurture their ideas.  It doesn’t behoove me to shoot people’s ideas down.  I want to lift them up.  I want them to go out and open up a restaurant and please people and make a better life for themselves.  That’s the intention.  It’s really inspiring, it’s inspiring for me and I think it’s really inspiring for the other judges as well.

Season two of 24 Hour Restaurant Battle premieres tonight (April 21) at 10pm/9c and airs each Thursday at that time on the Food Network.

Ted Allen calls you the tomato whisperer, what’s that all about?
He calls me all kinds of things.  That’s the only I can tell you about.  You know I do a spagehtti with tomato and basil and Ted happens to 

be a fan of it which is good for me.  We get a lot of press out of that speghetti with tomato and basil so it’s fortunate.  He likes what we do

with it.  I’ve made it with him a couple of times and he’s working on it so it’s all good.

After the success of Chopped All-Stars there is undoubtedly going to be another one.  How much pressure is Aaron putting on you to

compete?

You know I tell Aaron all the time I have six restaurants in five different markets I’m working on an events company as well I compete

enough in real life so there’s no reason for me to go behind those stoves.  I have to tell you, it doesn’t get out very often but on Chopped

that is an incredibly difficult competition.  As I’ve done those things in the past as I was coming up in the ranks and it’s tough.

Even though I’m kind of hard on some of these people sometimes it’s tough what they’re trying to do especially with all those cameras in

your face that doesn’t make things easy.

Can you compare and contrast between your duties on Chopped and on 24 Hour Restaurant Battle?

They are different.  On 24 Hours Restaurant Battle we have to look at the whole – the entire restaurant concept.  It’s not about picking it

apart; it’s about finding some of the things that work and some of the things that don’t work.  Which is what I do in real life with the

restaurants that I open.  It’s really tough to remain object when I opened my own restaurants.  There isn’t a single day when I shot one of

those show where I haven’t learned somethng myself about what I do on a daily basis.  I see the same mistakes that ameteurs are making

as season restauranteurs are making.

On Chopped it’s really about the food.  It’s about how to make this really varying basket of ingredients seemless in how they come

together.  A lot of people can do it a lot better than others especially with the time frame.

What exactly are you and the judges looking for from the contestants considering the 24 hour constraint?

What I always say is that we’re looking for clean, sure well thought out ideas.  Not just things going halfway or this is my intention but this is

the idea.  It’s really about opening a restaurant in 24 hours and you have to have everything buttoned up; everything has to be 100% of

your ability.  Sometimes the most simple approach works best.  But I think that translates to real life as well.  The more simple the better.

Even if you’re doing something very fancy, if you’re doing a high end restaurant simplicity is inheriantly better for the customer.

Are there any dishes that you’ve tried on 24 Hour Restaurant Battle that really stand out in your memory?

Yeah, I can’t speak about this current season but I can talk about the first season there was some great barbecue that we had on season

one.  We had some great little brunch ideas.  You know it’s funny because two of the contestants from the first season have actually gone

on and opened restaurants of their own based on a lot of hte critques the we gave helping them move forward.  They’ve created a very

different standard for themselves then they were when they first thought of opening up their own business.  That’s the real potential for me

with this show.  It’s really kind of nurturing and helping people, mentoring to a certain exstint about how to get a pure, clean idea and how

to make it straight forward for a business plan.

Have there been any concepts that you wish you had though of?

There were a couple of things that I though really resonated but I will say there were a few people that I said, “I would definitely hire this

person.”  I’d love this person and they could definitely give me a call if the need a job because I would hire them.

Have you ever heard someone explain their concept and immediately felt it was doomed?

Yes.  But you know what?  There are cetain things that I’m good at and certain things I’m not good at.  I think that I do what I do very well

and I can pick out and point out certain things but it’s always surprising what suceeds.  You’re always going to fail if you don’t try.  So even

if it is something that I may not ever go to or I may never eat at that restaurant it doesn’t mean that it won’t work for the rest of humanity.

So there’s no reason not to try it out.

Who will be the judges this season?

Drew Nieporent did a few shows.  Geoffrey Zakarian, I think he did the majority of the shows as well.  Geoffrey and I always have a fun

dynamic.  Alison Brod, for a PR perspective, did a few shows.  Gabriella Gershenson for afood writer’s perspective.  She works at

Saveur magazine.  Marcus Samuelsson did a few shows as well for another chef’s perspective, restaurantuers perspective.  So it’s a

great group, Ben Leventhal from TheFeast: New York and eater.com he did a show.  He may have done two.  There’s a couple of other

experts that we had for different approaches.  There’s a lot of knowledge at that judges table.

The chance at having your own restaurant, even for one night, is a dream that all of us in this business share.  How emotional does it get

on set?

You know, it’s really amazingly emotional for a lot of people.  This is a dream come true and I don’t think that can ever be overstated.

People are working really hard and they’re doing something that they’ve always wanted to do.  If they’re going through a funk or they’re in a

bad time this is their way out.  That’s one of the things that I really appreciate it about it as well.  We’re here to help people.  We’re here to

nurture their ideas.  It doesn’t behoove me to shoot people’s ideas down.  I want to lift them up.  I want them to go out and open up a

restaurant and please people and make a better life for themselves.  That’s the intention.  It’s really inspiring, it’s inspiring for me and I

think it’s really inspiring for th eother judges as well.

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Stuart in 80 Words or Less

Stuart is a celebrity chef, food activist and award-winning food writer. He penned the cookbooks Third Coast Cuisine: Recipes of the Gulf of Mexico, No Sides Needed: 34 Recipes To Simplify Life and Amigeauxs - Mexican/Creole Fusion Cuisine. He hosts two Internet cooking shows "Everyday Gourmet" and "Little Grill Big Flavor." His recipes have been featured in Current, Lagniappe, Southern Tailgater, The Kitchen Hotline and on the Cooking Channel.

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Stuart’s Honors & Awards

2015 1st Place Luck of the Irish Cook-off
2015 4th Place Downtown Cajun Cook-off
2015 2nd Place Fins' Wings & Chili Cook-off
2014 2015 4th Place LA Gumbo Cook-off
2012 Taste Award nominee for best chef (web)
2012 Finalist in the Safeway Next Chef Contest
2011 Taste Award Nominee for Little Grill Big Flavor
2011, 12 Member: Council of Media Tastemakers
2011 Judge: 29th Chef's of the Coast Cook-off
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Wing Cook-off
2011 Cooking Channel Perfect 3 Recipe Finalist
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Gumbo Cook-off
2011 Culinary Hall of Fame Member
2010 Tasty Awards Judge
2010 Judge: Bayou La Batre Gumbo Cook-off
2010 Gourmand World Cookbook Award Nominee
2010 Chef2Chef Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2010 Denay's Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2009 2nd Place Bay Area Food Bank Chef Challenge
2008 Tava: Discovery Contest Runner-up

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