Fish Dish

Fish Dish: Alaskan Hash

I was excited to find that my local market has started stocking Full Circle all natural, wild caught, US fish in its freezer section. I live on the Gulf Coast and can get fresh Gulf seafood but these are not indigenous fishcicles. So I have decided to share this culinary voyage with you. I won’t be providing recipes per se but instructions on how I fixed each Fish Dish.

Fish Dish: Alaskan Hash

Alaskan Hash

The folks in the Last Frontier have a culture and an attitude all their own.  They take traditional corned beef hash and substitute salmon for the brisket.  You can use your favorite hash brown recipe or follow mine.  This dish works for breakfast or dinner or lunch or after a midnight snack.

My first move was to season the fillet with salt and pepper.  On a small burner I placed a small sauce pan and filled it with about an inch of water.  I took a stainless steel ramekin and sprayed it with non-stick spray.  Inside the ramekin added an egg.  I then placed the ramekin into the simmering water to poach the egg.

On another burner I added a touch of olive oil to a medium-high pan and placed the salmon skin-side down.  A cooked it about 3 minutes on each side, medium-rare.  I moved the salmon to a side dish and added enough canola oil to cover the bottom of the pan.  To that I added about a 1/4 cup diced red onion.  A little salt and pepper and a toss or two and I was ready to add about 3/4 cup of shredded potatoes, enough to cover the bottom of the pan about 1/2? deep.  Season the hash with salt and pepper or seasoning salt (as well as the egg) and let cook for about 5 minutes or until golden brown.  Turn and let the other side brown.

Plate the hash browns and place the salmon back in the pan just to reheat, probably less than a minute, then onto the plate.  I topped the salmon with the poached egg and cracked the yolk as a sauce for the dish.

Fish Dish: Coconut Curry Ahi Over Udon

I was excited to find that my local market has started stocking Full Circle all natural, wild caught, US fish in its freezer section.  I live on the Gulf Coast and can get fresh Gulf seafood but these are not indigenous fishcicles.  So I have decided to share this culinary voyage with you.  I won’t be providing recipes per se but instructions on how I fixed each Fish Dish.

Fish Dish: Coconut Curry Ahi Tuna Over Udon

Ahi Tuna

I had my first Thai dish about 2 years ago but it has quickly become my favorite Asian cuisine.  I am in love with the sweet/hot contrast especially in the red curry coconut sauce, although I do love all of the curries.  Thai generally comes in three temperatures: hot, hotter, and holy s%@#!  I was afraid that the powerful flavor of the curry would overwhelm a more delicate fish so I chose the Ahi tuna for this recipe.

I brought 2 quarts of water to a boil and seasoned it with salt and a couple of small pieces of fresh ginger.  In the water I boiled my Udon noodles until done.  I set the Udon to the side and finely diced the ginger.  My next task was to saute onions, chilies, carrots and the ginger in a little olive oil simply seasoned with salt and pepper.  I removed the veggies and in the remaining oil I added my tuna.  I cooked the tuna just long enough to brown the side (about 2 minutes) then I turned it over.  I then added enough curry-coconut sauce to come half-way up the filet, reduced the heat and let simmer, covered, about 10 minutes.  In essence I poached the tuna in curry sauce.

The curry sauce is frighteningly easy to make.  First add a few tablespoons of canola oil to a medium-hot pan.  Next add a few tablespoons of red curry paste (available at that Asian market you’ve been wanting to go into but haven’t had a reason to yet.  You’re welcome).  Stir, heating through and then pour in a can of coconut milk.  Combine and simmer for a few minutes.  Jar and refrigerate until you are ready to use it.  NOTE: The more curry you use the hotter it will be.

Plating: Udon first, then tuna, pour the sauce over both, top with veggies and I garnished mine with almond slivers, and roughly chopped fresh basil and cilantro.  A squirt or two of freshly squeezed lime juice adds a little pop to the dish.

Fish Dish: Cedar Planked Salmon

I was excited to find that my local market has started stocking Full Circle all natural, wild caught, US fish in its freezer section.  I live on the Gulf Coast and can get fresh Gulf seafood but these are not indigenous fishcicles.  So I have decided to share this culinary voyage with you.  I won’t be providing recipes per se but instructions on how I fixed each Fish Dish.

Cedar planked salmon w/maple-bourbon glaze, steamed veggies w/brown rice.

The Finshed Product

Cooking on a cedar plank is an ancient Native American technique that transcends well to the modern world.  You can place the plank on an open fire, gas grill or as I did in a 350 oven.  Soaking the plank in water for a while is required; follow the directions on the plank you buy.

The glaze was insanely easy.  I stirred a tablespoon of Maker’s Mark Bourbon into two tablespoons Grade A maple syrup (not pancake syrup, the real stuff).  I seasoned the salmon with salt and pepper and placed it onto the plank and the plank into the oven for 1o minutes.  I then brushed the glaze on the salmon and back into the oven for 5 more minutes.  I simply steamed the veggies and pre-cooked brown rice until hot (the microwave does this well) and seasoned them with salt and pepper.  I poured the leftover glaze over everything.  The maple-bourbon glaze is addictive.

SeaBear Smokehouse

Fish Dish: Blackened Swordfish

I was excited to find that my local market has started stocking Full Circle all natural, wild caught, US fish in its freezer section. I live on the Gulf Coast and can get fresh Gulf seafood but these are not indigenous fishcicles. So I have decided to share this culinary voyage with you. I won’t be providing recipes per se but instructions on how I fixed each Fish Dish.

Blackened Swordfish

Fish Dish: Blackened Swordfish with Cajun Rice and Crème Fraîche Tarter Sauce.

Contrary to popular belief “blackening” food is not an age old Cajun or Creole cooking technique. It is, however, born from the imagination of one of America’s most important chefs, Paul Prudhomme.

Blackened anything has been seen on menues across the nation ever since Chef Prudhomme made Blackened Redfish the signature dish at K Paul’s, his famous French Quarter restaurant. The technique is as risqué for the cook as it is for the dinner as it temps both with high heat and a touch of danger.

The first thing you should do when attempting any blackened dish is open the closest window and turn your hood vent to HIGH. Coat your swordfish generously with blackening seasoning (Paul Prudhomme’s is available at your grocer or make one from scratch, the recipe for mine follows). Heat an iron skillet to medium-high to high, it should be smoking. Although traditional technique uses clarified butter, the purpose of this is to keep the dish healthy so I used canola oil, about 3 tablespoons. Add the swordfish; there should be LOTS of smoke.

After about 2 to 3 minutes turn your fish; it should looked nearly burnt. Reduce the heat to medium and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes. If you are cooking on electric you may want to remove the pan from the burner for about 30 seconds until the temprature levels out. Remove the fish to a plate. Add finely diced onions, celery and bell pepper to the pan and saute briefly before adding brown rice. Toss until heated through and season with a pinch more of the blackening seasoning.

The tarter sauce was easy. I added a tablespoon of Mrs. Renfro’s Hot Chow Chow to 3 tablespoons homemade Crème Fraîche. Using the same ratio you can add pickle relish to mayo to make a less fancy tarter sauce.

Blackening Seasoning from Third Coast Cuisine

* 6 teaspoons paprika
* 1 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
* 1/2 teaspoon each finely ground black pepper, finely ground white pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, & celery salt

Mix together and store in an airtight container.

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Stuart in 80 Words or Less

Stuart is a celebrity chef, food activist and award-winning food writer. He penned the cookbooks Third Coast Cuisine: Recipes of the Gulf of Mexico, No Sides Needed: 34 Recipes To Simplify Life and Amigeauxs - Mexican/Creole Fusion Cuisine. He hosts two Internet cooking shows "Everyday Gourmet" and "Little Grill Big Flavor." His recipes have been featured in Current, Lagniappe, Southern Tailgater, The Kitchen Hotline and on the Cooking Channel.

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Stuart’s Honors & Awards

2015 1st Place Luck of the Irish Cook-off
2015 4th Place Downtown Cajun Cook-off
2015 2nd Place Fins' Wings & Chili Cook-off
2014 2015 4th Place LA Gumbo Cook-off
2012 Taste Award nominee for best chef (web)
2012 Finalist in the Safeway Next Chef Contest
2011 Taste Award Nominee for Little Grill Big Flavor
2011, 12 Member: Council of Media Tastemakers
2011 Judge: 29th Chef's of the Coast Cook-off
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Wing Cook-off
2011 Cooking Channel Perfect 3 Recipe Finalist
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Gumbo Cook-off
2011 Culinary Hall of Fame Member
2010 Tasty Awards Judge
2010 Judge: Bayou La Batre Gumbo Cook-off
2010 Gourmand World Cookbook Award Nominee
2010 Chef2Chef Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2010 Denay's Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2009 2nd Place Bay Area Food Bank Chef Challenge
2008 Tava: Discovery Contest Runner-up

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