sauce

Recipe: Spiked Eggnog Bread Pudding

OK, one more bread pudding but I swear that’s it.

A friend sent me a text the other day, “Can you make me some bread pudding to feed 15 people?”

My reply was, “What kind?”

Hers was, “Whatever you think.”

You never want to leave me with that kind of play.

Spiked Eggnog Bread Pudding
Recipe Type: Dessert
Author: Stuart Reb Donald
Prep time: 30 mins
Cook time: 1 hour
Total time: 1 hour 30 mins
Serves: 8
Ingredients
    Bread Pudding

  • 2 cups demarerra sugar
  • 5 large beaten eggs
  • 2 eggnog
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 cups French bread, cubed and stale
  • 1/2 pound white chocolate chips

Hard Sauce

  • 1/2 cup (2 sticks) butter
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • Boubon to taste
Instructions
    Bread Pudding

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees (American).
  2. Grease a 13 by 9 by 2-inch pan with butter.
  3. Whisk together the sugar, eggs and eggnog in a bowl then mix in the vanilla. Pour over cubed bread and set aside for about 10 minutes.
  4. Pour bread mixture into prepared pan. Sprinkle white chocolate, mix and bake for 35 to 45 minutes, or until set. Remove from oven.

Hard Sauce

  1. Mix together the sugar and butter in a saucepan over low heat.
  2. Stir together until well blended.
  3. Add the vanilla, stirring well then the bourbon.
  4. Pour over the top of the bread pudding.

Review: KC Masterpiece Southern-Style BBQ Sauce

So recently I got an e-mail that I had been selected to receive a free sample of KC Masterpiece’s newest BBQ sauce, Southern-Style.  I don’t know what the selection process was but I am satisfied with the result, free stuff.

KC Masterpiece Southern-Style BBQ SauceSo I know what you may be asking, “Isn’t all barbecue sauce Southern?”  The answer, of course, is yes.  All barbecue is, at its heart, Southern but other areas have put their unique regional spin on it led of course by the folks in Kansas City.  In fact, the Kansas City style of sauce – tomato-based, sweet, smokey with a touch of spice – is what most people think of when they think of BBQ sauce.

There are literally hundreds of brands of BBQ sauce in the US however more than half of what is sold in stores carries the KC Masterpiece label.  The newest addition to the KC Masterpiece line is the Southern-Style which is essentially an homage to Memphis BBQ.

This sauce is still, at its roots, a Kansas City sauce but in Memphis the sauce is a little thinner, contains less sugar and more cider vinegar than its Midwestern cousin.  From a personal standpoint I have grown to prefer the Memphis version over the years.  I like a more acidic, less sweet sauce.

I have to admit that the KC Masterpiece Southern-Style is pretty darned good.  It has the tangy notes and bit of fire that I appreciate from the Memphis sauce when eating it on pork ribs or chicken.  For beef I still go for the standard KC style as I like the smokey sweetness better with beef.

I do have one complaint with KC Masterpiece Southern-Style BBQ Sauce but it’s the same complaint I have with most commercial sauces – High Fructose Corn Syrup.  I know it’s cheaper than sugar but it’s also much worse for you, too.  It’s the main reason I tend to make my sauce from scratch.  I would gladly pay a little extra for sauce made with cane sugar but I’m sure it is not a big deal to most people.  If HFCS isn’t an issue for you then you should have no reservations about trying this tasty new sauce.  In fact, even if it is an issue you should try a bottle; sometimes you have to dance with the devil.

Robb Walsh on Texas’ BBQ History

This is a great piece that was part of a History Channel pilot on food history. The network didn’t pick it up but I sure wish they would. This clip features Robb Walsh who was most recently the lead restaurant reviewer and food writer for the Houston Press, he is a food columnist for Natural History Magazine, a commentator for NPR and the author of several books including the Legends of Texas Barbecue Cookbook: Recipes and Recollections from the Pit Bosses.  Watch and learn:

BBQ Styles – A Primer

Food anthropologists (yes, that is a thing) say there are certain foods where people tend to be very territorial. The style one first tries of a certain dish soon becomes the only acceptable recipe. No food demonstrates this more than barbecue. Once one learns to move beyond local prejudice, a new world of flavors emerges. To reach this heightened awareness one need only stop comparing the foreign recipe to the familiar. Only then can we learn to accept the beauty of that which is unfamiliar; it could be said that barbecue is a metaphor for culture.

Alabama plays host to three styles of BBQ. The style that most of us grew up with here along the Gulf Coast is actually an example of Kansas City barbecue – various smoked meats glazed with a tomato-based, sweet and smokey sauce. About 90% of the commercial barbecue sauces sold in grocers are variations of Kansas City sauce and it is because of this that KC style is the nation’s favorite. KC Masterpiece is the most popular sauce controlling more than half of the US market.

North Alabama is heavily influenced by the approach made famous in Memphis. This Memphis style is made up mainly of smoked pork butt or spare ribs and is distinguishable by the use of a dry rub (recipe below) rather than a wet sauce. At the same time there is a distinctive Memphis sauce that is less sweet and more acidic than KC style but is still tomato-based. The Memphis style sauce is very common at North Alabama BBQ joints like Tuscaloosa’s legendary Dreamland.

East Alabama border communities like Opelika, Auburn, and their Georgia neighbors enjoy a sauce that uses mustard as it’s base and a very specific cut Cackalacky on BBQ Chickenof pork called a CT butt. The style is often called Smokey Pig because of the Columbus, GA shack that originated it. The mustard sauce (recipe below) most likely migrated from South Carolina and tends to be quite acidic and a touch on the spicy side. Moving from South to North Carolina the mustard disappears and the sauce is primarily vinegar and hot spices. In both Carolinas the primary meat is whole hog.

And Texas is a hole other matter. For these BBQ aficionados it is all about the smoke. The wood or combination of woods used in the smoking process is where the Texan expresses his individuality. Pork is rarely seen in the Lone Star State as Texans love their beef. The most popular cut in Texas is beef brisket because it captures the taste of smoke so well. Seldom will you ever find a bottle of sauce at an archetypal Texas smokehouse and those who dare bring their own should prepare for looks of disdain and the whispered murmurs of Yankee or city folk.

In the resorts of the Rocky Mountains classically trained chefs combine their refined European techniques with the wild flavors of the region. The result is a bold barbecue that uses grilled game like duck or venison and exotic sauces made with everything from raspberries to root beer. In Louisiana you might find a KC style sauce kicked-up with spices that add Cajun sizzle and in the Mississippi Delta they are fond of a sauce called Mississippi Blues that has blue berries as its main flavor ingredient.

Chicken seems to be universal in all regions of the country and can be augmented with a dry rub or any of the aforementioned wet sauces. Which brings us back to Alabama where we have a sauce formulated specifically for chicken. Alabama White BBQ Sauce hails from the northern half of the state and has been popularized at celebrated restaurants like Big Bob Gibson’s in Decatur. This sauce is mayonnaise-based with acidity coming from apple cider vinegar and sweetness from brown sugar; black pepper adds a little nutty heat to the finish.

Mustard Barbecue Sauce & Memphis Rub
Recipe Type: BBQ
Author: Stuart Reb Donald
Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 15 mins
Total time: 20 mins
Serves: Plenty
South Carolina mustard barbecue sauce can be traced to German settlers in the 18th century.
Ingredients
  • MUSTARD BARBECUE SAUCE:
  • 4 cups yellow mustard (two 20-ounce bottles of French’s mustard should do the trick)
  • 8 ounces of beer (less for thicker sauce, more for thinner sauce)
  • cup apple cider vinegar
  • 8 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup tomato puree
  • 2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon cayenne
  • 1 tablespoon fresh cracked black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • MEMPHIS RUB
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons celery salt
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Instructions
  1. SAUCE: Heat all ingredients in a sauce pan over medium heat and mix well. Cook until sauce just begins to thicken. Serve cool or warm. The sauce will last in the refrigerator for a long time. Quantity: 6 cups.
  2. RUB: Mix together and store in airtight container until ready to use.

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Stuart in 80 Words or Less

Stuart is a celebrity chef, food activist and award-winning food writer. He penned the cookbooks Third Coast Cuisine: Recipes of the Gulf of Mexico, No Sides Needed: 34 Recipes To Simplify Life and Amigeauxs - Mexican/Creole Fusion Cuisine. He hosts two Internet cooking shows "Everyday Gourmet" and "Little Grill Big Flavor." His recipes have been featured in Current, Lagniappe, Southern Tailgater, The Kitchen Hotline and on the Cooking Channel.

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Stuart’s Honors & Awards

2015 1st Place Luck of the Irish Cook-off
2015 4th Place Downtown Cajun Cook-off
2015 2nd Place Fins' Wings & Chili Cook-off
2014 2015 4th Place LA Gumbo Cook-off
2012 Taste Award nominee for best chef (web)
2012 Finalist in the Safeway Next Chef Contest
2011 Taste Award Nominee for Little Grill Big Flavor
2011, 12 Member: Council of Media Tastemakers
2011 Judge: 29th Chef's of the Coast Cook-off
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Wing Cook-off
2011 Cooking Channel Perfect 3 Recipe Finalist
2011 Judge: Dauphin Island Gumbo Cook-off
2011 Culinary Hall of Fame Member
2010 Tasty Awards Judge
2010 Judge: Bayou La Batre Gumbo Cook-off
2010 Gourmand World Cookbook Award Nominee
2010 Chef2Chef Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2010 Denay's Top 10 Best Food Blogs
2009 2nd Place Bay Area Food Bank Chef Challenge
2008 Tava: Discovery Contest Runner-up

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